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Small Business Covid-19 Updates (3.23.2020)


During the Covid-19 pandemic, SmallBusiness.com will be linking daily to articles related to its impact on small business owners and employees. Check back for updates.


Five steps to save small business during the pandemic

Five steps can help save small businesses during this pandemic-induced recession…

  1. Stop Commercial Evictions
  2. Defer Property Taxes
  3. Defer Commercial Rent Payments
  4. Defer Mortgage Payments
  5. Guarantee Jobs and Healthcare for Workers

Continue reading: Crain’s New York Business: “Five steps to save small business during the pandemic”


Coronavirus stimulus relief plea from self-employed to Washington: ‘We need help now’

“The self-employed – independent contractors, gig workers, temporary and part-time workers – number 57 million in the U.S., representing more than a third of the working population and driving $1 trillion in income, but have none of the benefits and protections that employees or even other small businesses do…”

Continue reading: USAToday.com “Coronavirus stimulus relief plea from self-employed to Washington: ‘We need help now’”


Amazon’s Bezos tells workers coronavirus will ‘get worse’

Amazon.com’s Chief Executive Officer Jeff Bezos warned his company’s 800,000 employees that the coronavirus outbreak will likely “get worse before it gets better,” according to an open letter shared Saturday on his Instagram account.

The letter follows cries from U.S. lawmakers and his own employees that the world’s largest online retailer isn’t doing enough to protect its

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Coronavirus (COVID-19): Small Business Guidance & Loan Resources (SBA, 3.23.2020)


This information is provided by the U.S. Small Business Administration. If you have a specific issue related to your business and Covid-19, use the SBA’s Local Assistance Directory to locate the office nearest your business. Other than appreciating and supporting the SBA, SmallBusiness.com is not associated with the SBA.

Update

This article was updated on March 22, 2020. Again, the links go to resources provided by the SBA.

Small Business Administration
Disaster Loan Assistance

Small Business Administration
Coronavirus (COVID-19): Small Business Guidance & Loan Resources


The SBA works directly with state governors to provide targeted, low-interest loans to small businesses and non-profits that have been severely impacted by the Covid-19.

The SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loan program provides small businesses with working capital loans of up to $2 million that can provide vital economic support to small businesses to help overcome the temporary loss of revenue they are experiencing. 

  • Find more information on the SBA’s Economic Injury Disaster Loans at: SBA.gov/Disaster.

Guidance for businesses and employers

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers the most up-to-date information on COVID-19. This interim guidance is based on what is currently known about the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). For updates from CDC, please see:

The following interim guidance may help prevent workplace exposures to acute respiratory illnesses, including COVID-19,

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Goldman takes on transaction banking

Goldman Sachs launched its new US transaction banking offering in June.

Following the launch of its consumer brand, Marcus, in 2016, the move is the latest of the firm’s new initiatives to target big pools of revenue in markets where it does not need to capture commanding share to grow a profitable business quickly. 

This is all part of a drive to attract operating deposits to lower the bank’s own cost of funds. 

Goldman has been working on the initiative for some time. It had taken roughly $500 billion of its own operational flows and brought them onto its own platform by the end of 2019.

It stated at the end of last year that the expectation was to have third-party customers and clients of the firm on the platform in 2020.

By June, all clients signed up so far were existing Goldman customers.

Eduardo-Vegara-Goldman-Sachs-160x186.jpg

Eduardo Vegara,
Goldman Sachs

“We started working on this two years ago. There was clearly an opportunity for a new entrant, but what form would it take?” explains Eduardo Vegara, global head of product and sales for transaction banking, who joined Goldman from California-based Silicon Valley Bank.

It is quite clear, he says, why the business had room for a new competitor.

“When we talked to clients, we heard a lot of dissatisfaction with existing

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First look at ECB PEPP debt-buying shows massive support for CP

European Central Bank headquarters, Frankfurt

Markets got their first glimpse on Tuesday, June 2, of just what the European Central Bank has been so busy buying in its Pandemic Emergency Purchase Programme (PEPP), a €750 billion scheme set up by the ECB in March to help maintain monetary policy transmission in the face of the economic chaos caused by government responses to the coronavirus pandemic.

While most purchases so far are of sovereign debt, as expected, the striking finding is that most of the private sector debt that the bank bought – some 76% of the €46 billion total in that segment  – was in the commercial paper (CP) market.

Within that, some 81% – a total of €28.7 billion – was primary issuance.

ECB graph1

It was in CP where some of the earliest corporate funding pain was felt as liquidity began to dry up in the middle of March, a factor that led to companies quickly drawing on their bank lines to refinance paper that could not be rolled over, as well as to provide additional working capital.

That pressure began to ease as stimulus measures kicked in  – including the ECB’s PEPP, which expanded on existing measures like the asset purchase programme (APP) and the corporate sector purchase programme (CSPP).

The PEPP waived previous eligibility requirements to allow

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Coronavirus: IFC fires out $8 billion fast-track financing – for starters

On the frontline of the fight against Covid-19, the International Finance Corporation (IFC) is working against the clock to ensure jobs and businesses are kept afloat as developing countries face one of the worst healthcare and economic crises in history.

Sérgio Pimenta, IFC’s vice president for the Middle East and Africa, tells Euromoney via video link from Washington that the IFC’s first priority is to ensure the rapid disbursement of its $8 billion fast-track financing package to 300 of its existing clients that most need support.

“The goal of the $8 billion financing is really to help companies going through this difficult time and to preserve jobs,” he says.

The IFC’s response has four components, with $2 billion allocated to four separate response facilities, which range from direct funding via loans and equity investments to vulnerable companies, to trade finance support and working capital for emerging market banks.

Immediate focus

The immediate focus is to help existing clients, says Pimenta, because they are in a better position to absorb the financing.

In the health sector for example, the IFC’s facilities will cover clinics, medical equipment and pharmaceutical companies, helping to meet the need for additional equipment globally and ensuring supply chains are functioning.

“Whether masks or ventilators, a lot of this supply comes from China, so it is important

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Coronavirus: Dividend futures – the Nostradamus trade

Most European banks have indicated that they will suspend dividend payments after the Bank of England followed the European Central Bank in discouraging payouts to shareholders while the coronavirus crisis rages.

The list of non-bank companies suspending their dividends is also growing, with Goldman Sachs predicting a 25% fall in payouts by S&P 500 index members this year – a forecast that balances payments already made with a 38% fall for the last nine months of 2020.

Other analysts expect a fall in dividend payments from European companies that may be close to a decline in earnings of around 50%.

Global dividend payments rose by 3.5% last year to a record total of the equivalent of $1.43 trillion, according to a study released by Janus Henderson in February, which noted that underlying growth compared with 2018 was 5.4% before allowing for the effect of strength in the US dollar.

The US accounted for the biggest proportion of this, with dividend payouts of $490.8 billion. Dividends from European companies ex-UK were down slightly in dollar terms at $251.4 billion, but after adjusting for exchange rate movements underlying growth was at 3.8%.

Janus Henderson pointed out that expectations for company earnings growth were modest but felt confident enough to assert that: “2020 is set to deliver the fifth consecutive year of

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