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This Is the Most Important Thing to Consider When Selling Your Business. (Hint: It’s Not the Price.)


5 min read

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I’ve seen a frustrating trend play out recently.

Owners of small to medium-sized businesses give their lives to their work, and it’s my they should get back as much as they possibly can for all they’ve put in. But I can’t do that when I get a call not only after someone’s already decided to sell, but after they’ve already agreed to a deal — which nearly 10 of my clients have recently done.

I’ve written about the need to have a plan in place for exiting your business before, but this recent spat of calls made me realize it’s not just about having a plan. It’s about something both bigger and more basic.

When deciding whether it’s time to sell your business, you have to start by being honest with yourself.

How much should you sell your business for?

The most business owners don’t like to hear is that the overall value placed on your business is much less important than how the deal is structured. And I can only help those who’ve internalized this advice enough to know to call before they decide to sell.

Related: 5 Tips to Successfully Sell Your Company

Think of it this way: Would you rather sell

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Free Webinar | June 24: Nailing Your Competitive Advantage

Join us as we discuss different ways that founders can bring something new to the table and how to pivot existing ideas and concepts in the new normal.

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Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


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5 Steps Entrepreneurs Can Take to Adapt During Difficult Times


7 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


Proof that pandemics can accelerate innovation can be found as far back as the Black Death in Europe during the 1300s. The Plague eventually forced the people of the Late Middle Ages to reassess their medical practices — which were previously rooted in religion — and adapt them in favor of a more scientific approach, thereby moving the world towards modern medicine. 

Of course, the medical field is ripe for innovative ideas and tools to combat the novel coronavirus. It’s why we’re already seeing tech startups leverage AI as an effective tool during the pandemic. 

One of the earliest examples of this came on Dec. 31, when BluDot, a company tracking the spread of infectious diseases using artificial intelligence, informed their clients of a collection of pneumonia-related cases in Wuhan, China, a week before the World Health Organization announced the discovery of the novel coronavirus.

Perhaps one of the best ways AI can combat COVID-19 might be in its ability to help researchers predict the evolution of the virus. This could come in the form of learning algorithms that simulate the different ways the virus can evolve, allowing researchers to add potential vaccines to the algorithm to test against each mutation. It’s an idea already

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Small Business Optimism Rebounds in May But Earning Trends Decline (2020)


In May, NFIB’s monthly Small Business Optimism Index rebounded from its historic drop over the past three months. In May, the index increased 3.5 points to 94.4, an improvement from April’s 90.9 reading.


Eight of the ten index components improved in May, two declined.


“As states begin to reopen, small businesses continue to navigate the economic landscape rocked by COVID-19 and new government policies. It’s still uncertain when consumers will feel comfortable returning to small businesses and begin spending again, but owners are taking the necessary precautions to reopen safely.”

Bill Dunkelberg
NFIB Chief Economist


As NFIB reported in its monthly jobs report last week, the small business labor market weakened further in the February-April period. May survey respondents reported a reduction in employment by 0.17 workers per firm in the prior three months.


The NFIB Research Foundation has collected Small Business Economic Trends data with quarterly surveys since the 4th quarter of 1973 and monthly surveys since 1986. Survey respondents are drawn from NFIB’s membership. The report is released on the second Tuesday of each month. This survey was conducted in May 2020. 


Charts: NFIB

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  • Check back

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6 Tips to Make Remote Work Actually Work

Remote work expert Nick Sonnenberg shares practical advice.

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5 min read

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I recently had the opportunity to meet with Nick Sonnenberg, an expert on remote work and the CEO and founder of , a 100-plus person fully remote company. Through building his company from the ground up and helping businesses of all sizes increase their and go remote, he’s developed a few tips that any business owner can implement to make remote work actually work.

Face-to-face communication is massively important for remote companies. The intonations, inflections and verbal cues you get from a face-to-face conversation simply can’t be beat. Video conferencing should always be the default for in order to keep personal relationships alive among your team. That said, real-time conversations aren’t always necessary and scheduling them can be difficult. If you need to send a quick message to someone, consider doing it with a video recording. This allows you to keep that face-to-face connection and easily explain your message. Plus, the recipient can view it when it’s convenient for them.

2. Find a meeting cadence and stick to it

Setting a meeting cadence is one of the first steps you should

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